The home of Sweaty Spice, the 'other' Spice Girl

With me feeding my internal gear head on Youtube, I have stumbled on a cold of channels that just fascinate me. The premise is simple. Acquire a wrecked motor or other similar mechanical component, tear it down, and identify what caused it to grenade, and point out design issues, and in 20 - 30 minutes, you get a pretty good view of what is going on.

The two that I follow at this moment are “I Do Cars” and “Speedkar99”.

The first one I watched was Speedkar99 tear down a wrecked Subaru 2.5l that had seized. Apparently the boxer engine has some design flaws that can punish you if you fail to keep up on your maintenance.

I was hooked.

The videos are simple. An engine, on a stand, some air/power tools, and a narrating mechanic who disassembles and comments as they go through.

All the motors are what are called “cores.”

The term “Core” has a specific meaning. When an “expensive” part fails, and you need to replace it, the price includes what is called a “Core” charge. That is essentially a deposit to encourage you to return it. Returned parts are examined and if not too damaged, are re-manufactured, and put into the parts pool.

Thus, these are pretty much destroyed. One of the two Vloggers owns a wrecking yard and sells what parts are good via their eBay store.

Some highlights:

Speedkar99 let out the gem while disassembling the BMW N52 inline 6, that you can tell it is a BMW motor because it is leaking oil (the n52 is mounted tilted and that means that many seals are bathed in oil, and the mix of materials (steel/iron/aluminum/phenolic) leads to thermal cycle induced seepage.

I Do Cars rails on Chrysler for their habit of dropping valve seats (from a Viper V10 he disassembled).

Or the interesting failure modes. Speedkar99 tore down a Chevy LS motor that clearly had gone too long between oil changes (gnarly deposits), or the proverbial “Money Shift” issues caused by over-revving. Parts break, fly around, and do a ton of very costly damage.

Or the Mazda 13B rotary motor that at 90K needed to be rebuilt (apparently 90K miles is about the extent of the life.

Or the Honda K20 where the connecting rod tried to escape from the block.

All the stuff nightmares are made of if you are a gear head. Like a horror movie that you can’t turn away from. And indeed, I am totally addicted.

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